Search

Rural rail lines closed in 1960s could be reopened

PUBLISHED: 23:07 29 November 2017 | UPDATED: 10:05 30 November 2017

Kings Lynn - Hunstanton railway closure - people waiting at train station pic taken 23rd dec 1968 m10415-39a pic to be used in lets talk jan 2017

Kings Lynn - Hunstanton railway closure - people waiting at train station pic taken 23rd dec 1968 m10415-39a pic to be used in lets talk jan 2017

Plans described as “difficult and “unambitious” could reverse swathing cuts to the rural rail network by restoring services which were scrapped in the 1960s.

The Heritage Centre in Hunstanton. Pictured is Hunstanton Railway Station. Picture: Ian Burt The Heritage Centre in Hunstanton. Pictured is Hunstanton Railway Station. Picture: Ian Burt

As part of the Beeching Cuts, thousands of stations and hundreds of branch lines were closed between 1964 and 1970 in the wake of a report by British Railways chairman Dr Richard Beeching.

But Transport Secretary Chris Grayling this week announced he wants to identify which routes would boost the economy, encourage house building and ease overcrowding.

The Department for Transport (DfT) has pledged to “accelerate” the reopening of the rail link between Oxford and Cambridge.

In the Beeching Cuts the Dereham to Wells line vanished in 1964, followed by Dereham to Wymondham in 1969 and King’s Lynn to Dereham in 1968.

Places -- W / Transport -- Trains

A slice of railway nostalgia -- and a large dollop of poetic licence from the photographer. Alec Tuck was pictured apparently putting his back into operating the former Wells station turntable. But things are not quite what they seem in this evocative photo. His brother later pointed out that the shot was clearly posed as the engine had already been turned ready to roll backwards to the engine shed. Another give-away was the image of engine driver Bill Chapman, with his back to camera looking rather less than concerned while his fireman did the work. Alec, who has since died, was a member of a true railway family. His father Ted, was the last driver in charge of the Wells loco department, while brother John was a railway clerk and another brother Geoffrey also worked as a fireman.
Photograph and caption used  in EDP Places -- W / Transport -- Trains A slice of railway nostalgia -- and a large dollop of poetic licence from the photographer. Alec Tuck was pictured apparently putting his back into operating the former Wells station turntable. But things are not quite what they seem in this evocative photo. His brother later pointed out that the shot was clearly posed as the engine had already been turned ready to roll backwards to the engine shed. Another give-away was the image of engine driver Bill Chapman, with his back to camera looking rather less than concerned while his fireman did the work. Alec, who has since died, was a member of a true railway family. His father Ted, was the last driver in charge of the Wells loco department, while brother John was a railway clerk and another brother Geoffrey also worked as a fireman. Photograph and caption used in EDP "North Norfolk Images" book, published in 1998 Dated -- Mid 1950s Photograph -- C6441

Services between Swaffham and Thetford stopped running in 1964.

Labour’s shadow transport secretary Andy McDonald described the proposals to reopen lines as “unambitious” and “more jam tomorrow from a Government which has run out of ideas”.

He went on: “The Tories’ record is of delayed, downgraded and cancelled investment, huge disparities in regional transport spending and soaring fares that are pricing passengers off the railway.

“This unambitious strategy stands in contrast to Labour’s plan to upgrade and expand the rail network across the country.”

Stephen Joseph, chief executive of the Campaign for Better Transport, warned that it is “desperately difficult to reopen a rail line”.

He said: “This announcement needs to be backed both with new investment and a commitment to guiding local authorities through the sometimes labyrinthine processes of the railway.”

The charity identified a dozen rail lines which it claims have strong economic and social cases for reopening, and a further 200 being campaigned for locally.

They include King’s Lynn to Hunstanton, Norwich to Wells, King’s Lynn to Dereham, and the creation of a “Norfolk Orbital Railway” to link Sheringham with Fakenham.

The announcement comes amid reports that the DfT will overhaul rail franchises and reform Network Rail.

In December last year Mr Grayling revealed that he wants the publicly owned company to share its responsibility for running the tracks with private train operators.

Other popular content

Yesterday, 11:35

A man who was missing for more than a week has been charged in connection with an incident of arson in Halesworth.

A jungle paradise hidden in the depths of East Anglia is set to play host to a wedding for the very first time.

11:19

Police are hunting a man who exposed himself to a dog walker.

Yesterday, 16:19

Police have confirmed that a woman who went missing and was the subject of an extensive search has been found.

Most Read

Yesterday, 11:35

A man who was missing for more than a week has been charged in connection with an incident of arson in Halesworth.

Read more

A jungle paradise hidden in the depths of East Anglia is set to play host to a wedding for the very first time.

Read more
United Kingdom
11:19

Police are hunting a man who exposed himself to a dog walker.

Read more
Prince
Yesterday, 16:19

Police have confirmed that a woman who went missing and was the subject of an extensive search has been found.

Read more
Suffolk Police

After opening her first shop only weeks before the start of the recession in 2007, a Bungay florist is celebrating the opening of a new shop in the town centre.

Read more
Norwich

Later in Life

cover

Click here to view
the Later in Life
supplement

View

Local Weather

Partly Cloudy

Partly Cloudy

max temp: 15°C

min temp: 11°C

Show Job Lists

Digital Edition

Image
Read the Beccles and Bungay Journal e-edition today
E-edition

Newsletter Sign Up

Beccles and Bungay Journal weekly newsletter
Sign up to receive our regular email newsletter

Our Privacy Policy