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East Anglian angling summit discusses threats posed by otters, drought and illegal fishing

19:02 24 March 2012

As the sun sets on another season, today

As the sun sets on another season, today's summit discussed what lies ahead for angling in East Anglia and further afield.

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Angling’s voice is getting louder, a regional summit to discuss the future of the sport heard today - but there’s still plenty it needs to shout about.

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Trust us to look after angling

The Angling Trust was set up in 2009, following the merger of groups including the National Federation of Anglers, Anglers Conservation Association and Specialist Anglers Association.

Its regional forums work directly with the Environment Agency and other government bodies, on issues affecting the well-being of both fisheries and fishing.

As he welcomed delegates to today’s meeting Kelvin Allen, who chairs the AT’s Eastern Region Forum, said: “The Angling Trust is doing an awful lot on a national level.

“We’re in a really good position from the grassroots, from individual level. We’ve got a very strong regional forum.”

In his keynote address, Martin Salter said: “It’s probably our best forum in terms of activity. It’s our most active forum.”

Delegates from across East Anglia discussed the impact of predation, drought and illegal fishing on waters across the region, at a forum convened by the Angling Trust at the Environment Agency’s offices at Huntingdon.

Former Labour MP Martin Salter, the AT’s new campaigns co-ordinator, said 15,000-strong trust was now growing rapidly.

“From an organisation that was almost bankrupt two years ago, we’ve turned the corner, we’ve started to attract members in record numbers,” he said.

After leaving Parliament at the last election, Salter went on sabbatical to Australia, where he was commissioned to produce a report on how angling could become a stronger political force.

"The Angling Trust is the only show in town. This is the only chance we’ll have in a generation to have a unified voice for angling."

Former Labour MP Martin Salter

He told today’s meeting the most effective angling lobby was in New Zealand, where everyone who bought a fishing licence automatically became a member of the sport’s governing body.

“It’s run by anglers, for anglers and they’ve got some of the best fishing in the world,” he said.

Salter said the powerful US angling lobby enjoyed considerable funding.

“In terms of political clout, America has a lobby on tackle and boat fuel, so it puts a lot of money in the pot,” he said.

Lifelong angler Salter got elected onto his local council in Reading after he campaigned to overturn a fishing ban it had imposed on a stretch of the Thames through the town, before becoming MP for Reading West, in 1997. He said his political career had taught him what politicians listen to.

“They do take notice of numbers, they do take notice of professional, coherent bodies,” he said. “Not five or six different voices.

“The Angling Trust is the only show in town. This is the only chance we’ll have in a generation to have a unified voice for angling.”

Salter said the main challenge facing angling was helping to ensure a healthy aquatic environment.

He told the meeting, attended by 50 delegates: “Without a healthy aquatic environment, without recruitment of fish, we don’t have a sport.”

Fisheries expert Ash Girdler gave a presentation on predation, looking at birds and otters which have decimated stocks in some waters.

“The way forward has got to be through joined-up argument and representation at a national level,” he said. “We have got to deal with this on a national basis.”

Girdler outlined how non-lethal methods such as floating fish refuges and sight lines could be employed to reduce the impact of fish-eating birds on stocks, before turning to otters.

“Nobody is going to wipe out cormorants,” he added. “With otters, the only way to deal with them is a mechanism where fisheries can get grants to fence off their fisheries.”

Last week EA scientists began moving fish from the Maxey Cut, near Peterborough, which is expected to dry out altogether this summer.

David Hawley, the EA’s area environment manager, said lack of rain and a chronic soil moisture deficit left many waters in a vulnerable condition.

“The sun’s shining, the leaves are on the trees, the soil moisture deficit’s going to start going up,” he said. “We’re going to be in for a difficult summer.

“We don’t know how long this is going to last, it could be for another year, it could go on for another couple of years.”

Hawley said river flows were at something like a quarter of the volume expected at this time of year.

“We know that some river stretches are drying up,” he added. “The likelihood is we’ll be asking for full irrigation bans if we get the drought forecast this summer.”

Hawley said one risk of low flows was that rivers with sluices separating them from tidal channels would suffer saline ingress. He said pike were usually the first species to suffer from this. “If you ever come to a situation where just pike are dying, it’s salt,” he added.

Hawley - himself a pike angler - showed the meeting pictures of some of his favourite drains and rivers covered in the blanket weed which affected the Cut-Off, Witham and other waters last season.

He predicted the problem would be as bad next season, adding a pot of “a few thousand pounds” available for weed control.

Roger Hanford, one of the EA’s chief fishery scientists, reported on a tagging project set up as part of the agency’s investigations into declining barbel numbers in the middle reaches of the Ouse.

Twenty fish ranging from 6 - 16lbs were tagged with tracking devices, before their movements were monitored over two years.

Anglers and the angling press have blamed otters for the decline in the iconic river species.

But Hanford said: “We tagged 20 large barbel in a stretch otters are known to frequent and we still have 20 large barbel.”

He added on one occasion, an angler told a fishery scientist there were no barbel left in the stretch, before she replied that there were two tagged fish in his swim.

Further investigations revealed fry recruitment was poor, while gravel beds used for spawning had become clogged with silt and weed. Hanford said the project was an example of research funded by anglers’ rod licence fees.

David Hawley outlined the EA’s new approach to tackling illegal fishing and enforcement. He said the agency was moving away from part-time bailiffs checking rod licences to an intelligence-led approach with full-time enforcement officers.

“We are quite thinly-spread on the ground, I know in my area there’s an awful lot of this kind of stuff going on and I’d dearly love to crack down on it,” he said, after showing slides of gill nets, long lines and a dead pike killed by a set line.

Denis Moules, from the Pike Anglers Club, said it had set up a riverwatch scheme and after meeting with enforcement officers, its members would be sharing information with them.

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2 comments

  • The biggest threat to our river and fish are not Otter's, Cormorants, illegal fishing, or drought but abstraction and pollution.

    Report this comment

    John L Norton

    Sunday, March 25, 2012

  • This is typical of special interest groups taking over public property for their own purpose. Otters and cormorants have been fishing the waters long before man came along, now fisherMEN want to prevent these creatures from reaching their food source. What are otters supposed to do, go to Tesco?

    Report this comment

    kenneth jessett

    Sunday, March 25, 2012

The views expressed in the above comments do not necessarily reflect the views of this site

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