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Bungay girl's memory benefits charity

PUBLISHED: 17:38 24 April 2008 | UPDATED: 07:22 01 August 2010

DONATIONS in memory of a Bungay girl who captured the hearts of many were presented to the Rett Syndrome Association on Friday.

Eleven-year-old Nicola Timberlake died suddenly in February after suffering from birth from the neurological disorder which affects one in 10,000 girls, and the donations totalled £832.

DONATIONS in memory of a Bungay girl who captured the hearts of many were presented to the Rett Syndrome Association on Friday.

Eleven-year-old Nicola Timberlake died suddenly in February after suffering from birth from the neurological disorder which affects one in 10,000 girls, and the donations totalled £832.16.

They included £212.34 from Warren Special School at Oulton Broad where Nicola was a pupil, £454.82 from donations and collection at her funeral service at Emmanuel Church, £100 from Cantor's Charity Bash, and private donations from friends, relatives and neighbours.

Nicola's parents, Steve and Leah, presented the cheques at their home in Tower Mill Road to Ron Overton, director of the charity, who said it would be split between research into finding a cure and supporting some of the therapy clinics treating others with Rett Syndrome.

“I am delighted with this. I was at Nicola's funeral and it was a real privilege to be there. The money that has been gathered is a testimony to how much she touched people's hearts in the area and the regard for Steve and Leah and their family,” he said.

Steve said the donations and the way they would be used to help other suffers of Rett were a nice way for Nicola to be remembered.

“We are grateful for all the support we have had and for the many people who have contributed to the donations and the collection at the service,” he said. “Cossey Funeral Services told us it was the highest amount they had handled from a collection and donations.”

The Rett Syndrome Association provides research funding into a condition which may not be obvious but is present at birth and becomes more evident during the second year. Most who have it are profoundly and multiply disabled and totally dependent on others.

The association works with professionals to establish knowledge and good practice in care and management of the condition, liases with a team of experts, supports families and self-help support groups, and provides a wide range of information.

For more information on it and the association, visit www.rettsyndrome.org.uk


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