Search

Halesworth charity helps nurture talent

PUBLISHED: 08:00 12 March 2010 | UPDATED: 09:25 01 August 2010

A TALENTED young man who dropped out of university because of learning difficulties has been given a leg up by a Halesworth charity.

Suffolk Artlink, which offers creative activities to vulnerable people, is providing one of just 10 Creative Apprenticeships in Suffolk.

A TALENTED young man who dropped out of university because of learning difficulties has been given a leg up by a Halesworth charity.

Suffolk Artlink, which offers creative activities to vulnerable people, is providing one of just 10 Creative Apprenticeships in Suffolk.

The apprenticeships are offered by the Arts Council for 16 to 25-year- olds who have learning difficulties, but still have plenty to offer in the creative sector.

Miles Row started his apprenticeship at Suffolk Artlink in January after dropping out of Keele University.

Mr Row, 22, was in his third year studying mathematics and philosophy, with a view to moving into the creative sector. However, he failed two modules because of his dyslexia, and had all but given up on a career in the arts until he found out about the Creative Apprenticeship.

“I was looking for jobs but failing miserably,” he said. “The Creative Apprenticeship meant I could think about a career. I'm a lot more positive about working in general. It's been going good. I've been finding out quite a lot about what goes on behind the scenes.”

Suffolk Artlink is based in Miles Ward Court and offers a range of courses, particularly for older people, young people at risk of exclusion or offending, or people with disabilities.

Chris Warner, a director of Suffolk Artlink, said Mr Row would go from strength to strength. “He's making a large contribution to our organisation,” he said. “We've been amazed by what he had to offer.”

Mr Row believes that he was able to get the apprenticeship at Suffolk Artlink because he could identify with its work.

“I think it was because I was interested in helping excluded people,” he said. “Because of having learning difficulties I can identify with how if affects people.”

When he has finished the apprenticeship, Mr Row will have a qualification in arts management.

As part of his apprenticeship he will soon be co-ordinating his own project, Soundbeam, which allows people with mobility problems to make music. He will be running the project at the Thomas Wolsey School in Ipswich, where he lives.

For more information on Suffolk Artlink, visit the website www.suffolkartlink.org.uk.

Most Read

Most Read

Latest from the Beccles and Bungay Journal

Hot Jobs

Show Job Lists