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Man died after falling on to knife

PUBLISHED: 10:18 23 October 2008 | UPDATED: 07:43 01 August 2010

A FATHER-of-four died in a freak accident when he fell on to a kitchen knife he had been using to cut broad beans, an inquest heard yesterday.

The death of 58-year-old Roy Haynes was originally treated as murder due to the bizarre circum-stances - he was found dead from a stab wound in the driveway of his home in Rectory Road, Haddiscoe.

A FATHER-of-four died in a freak accident when he fell on to a kitchen knife he had been using to cut broad beans, an inquest heard yesterday.

The death of 58-year-old Roy Haynes was originally treated as murder due to the bizarre circum-stances - he was found dead from a stab wound in the driveway of his home in Rectory Road, Haddiscoe.

But Norfolk police carried out a full investigation and found no evidence of wrongdoing. Joseph Haynes, Mr Haynes's 20-year-old son who found his body, was arrested and question-ed on suspicion of murder. He was released without charge and officers are sure the death was an accident.

Norfolk coroner William Armstrong, recording a verdict of accidental death, said: “I am more than satisfied there has been an exhaustive investigation by the police.

“I am absolutely convinced that this was not suicide or homicide but was the result of a freak accident when Mr Haynes fell on to this knife when it was close to his chest.”

Det Insp Jez Fry told the inquest that police had been alerted to the death by paramedics on the morning of July 18. The paramedics had found Joseph attempting to resuscitate his father, as he had been instructed to do after dialling 999.

Because of the amount of blood present, it was initially thought Mr Haynes had suffered more than one wound. However, a later examination found a sole injury.

Mr Fry said: “There were four possibilities: that a third person was involved; that the injury was self-inflicted; that it was an accident; or that Joseph was responsible.

“There was no evidence of any other person being involved, either forensically or through any witness. The nature of the wound excluded any possibility it was self-inflicted.

“The only realistic explanation was that it was caused by an accident.”

This conclusion was supported by pathologist Nat Cary who found there was “no evidence of assault or restraint”.

Mr Haynes worked at the James Paget University Hospital at Gorleston for 13 years as director of human resources and operations until his retirement in June 2006.

Following Mr Haynes's death, board chairman John Hemming paid tribute to his former colleague, describing him as a “highly regarded member of the team”.

Mr Haynes is survived by wife Susan, sons Daniel and Joseph and daughters Kate and Alice.

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