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Warning over pre-Christmas Amazon scam

PUBLISHED: 09:23 11 December 2019 | UPDATED: 10:51 11 December 2019

Norfolk Trading Standards is warning the public to be aware of phishing emails pretending to be from Amazon in the run up to Christmas. Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto

Norfolk Trading Standards is warning the public to be aware of phishing emails pretending to be from Amazon in the run up to Christmas. Photo: Getty Images/iStockphoto

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Norfolk trading standards officers are warning people to be aware of “phishing” emails pretending to be from Amazon in the run-up to Christmas.

Norfolk Trading Standards is warning the public to be aware of phishing emails pretending to be from Amazon in the run up to Christmas. Picture: GettyNorfolk Trading Standards is warning the public to be aware of phishing emails pretending to be from Amazon in the run up to Christmas. Picture: Getty

The trading standards team has heard of multiple concerns from residents receiving emails from 'Amazon' asking for sensitive information.

A spokesman from Norfolk Trading Standards said: "Phishing and spoof e-mails look similar to genuine e-mails from Amazon.co.uk.

"Often these e-mails refer to a recent order, a charge, or an issue with your account that requires urgent attention in order to lure you into clicking on a link or calling a phone number.

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Once directed to the fraudulent site, which looks similar to Amazon, the public will then be asked to give over their account information and password, stealing sensitive information.

The spokesman said: "This information can be used without your knowledge or permission, in order to commit fraud."

Amazon will never ask you for the following information in an e-mail communication: Your national insurance number, bank account information, credit card number, PIN number, or credit card security code (including "updates" to any of the above), your mother's maiden name or other information to identify you or your Amazon.co.uk password.

If you are concerned that you have received a phishing or spoofed e-mail, report it to Amazon so that they can investigate.

Open a new e-mail and attach the e-mail you suspect is fake. Send this to stop-spoofing@amazon.com.

Sending this suspicious e-mail as an attachment is the best way for Amazon to track it. If you can't send the e-mail as an attachment, you can forward it to stop-spoofing@amazon.com.


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