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'Remarkable' fundraiser remembered

PUBLISHED: 08:00 24 December 2008 | UPDATED: 07:52 01 August 2010

THE legacy of Bungay's charity fundraiser Dinky Payne, who died earlier this month, was the many hundreds, if not thousands, of unknown people her fundraising helped in a variety of ways, a large congregation at a thanks-giving service for her was told.

THE legacy of Bungay's charity fundraiser Dinky Payne, who died earlier this month, was the many hundreds, if not thousands, of unknown people her fundraising helped in a variety of ways, a large congregation at a thanks-giving service for her was told.

Terry Reeve, who had known Florence Payne, always known as Dinky, for many years, said in a tribute to her at the service at Holy Trinity Church on Friday that her charitable nature began when she was a schoolgirl, and later her stated aim of her fundraising was to help alleviate pain and suffering - most of the causes she helped involved the disabled, or people who were ill, and those institutions and individuals who worked to treat them.

Mrs Payne ran her charity fundraising stall at the Angel Inn yard for 20 years, from 1974, and helped nearly 100 projects in all.

“Her unstinting work at her stall in the Angel Inn yard was phenomenal, and we are here today to mourn, and remember and be thankful for the life of a truly remarkable, wonderful woman who gave so willingly of her time and effort to help so many. She is remembered with great affection by all of us here today and by so many others in Bungay and far beyond - and of course by Sid, and Peter and Mary and their wider families,” Mr Reeve said.

“She told me once: 'It is lovely to be able to give people £1,000 and know it is doing good.' Well, Dinky, this guardian angel of so many causes, gave away 180,000 £1,000s over the course of 20 years, and after her stall finished the town council established Dinky's Garden, beside the Angel, as a permanent tribute to her.

“She was rightly proud of what she achieved, but modest too, and always quick to acknowledge those who knitted for her, donated items, or helped her, particularly her husband Sid, and Morag Workman, a loyal helper, with husband William, for many years.

“But the real legacy of this remarkable, selfless Bungay woman is those whose quality of life she has helped to enhance through her work.”

He listed some of the hospitals, clinics, and organisations she had raised money for, and said:

“Dinky helped nearly 100 projects in her time, and so helped hundreds, maybe thousands of people in a variety of ways - people unknown to her or us. That is the true legacy of Dinky, and I'm sure it was the thought of those unknown people she could potentially help that drove her on, and saw her at her stall in all weathers.”

John Palin, who had also known her for many years, read St Bernadette's Prayer, one of Dinky's favourites. The service was taken by the Vicar, the Rev Ian Byrne, who also paid tribute to her caring and loving nature. Two of her favourite pieces of music, Glen Miller's In the Mood, and Pie Jesu, were played during the service, which followed private cremation. The congregation included representatives of many of the organisations and charities which she helped.

Mrs Payne, who lived in Bungay all her life, died, aged 92, after suffering from cancer for a year. She leaves her husband, Sid, who is 93, children Peter and Mary, four grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren, and a great-great-grandchild.

Donations are being invited in memory of Dinky for New Thresholds, the East Anglian Air Ambulance, and The Leprosy Mission. They can be sent to the Rosedale Funeral Home, 16, Upper Olland Street, Bungay NR35 1BG.

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