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Seven-year-old inspires classmates with charity day

PUBLISHED: 10:00 29 May 2015

Megan Saul raised £377 for Cystic Fibrosis by asking everyone in her school to come in wearing yellow and bring a donation.
She also gave a speech about how it affects her. She is seven and was diagnosed at three weeks old. 

Megan using her trampoline.

Megan Saul raised £377 for Cystic Fibrosis by asking everyone in her school to come in wearing yellow and bring a donation. She also gave a speech about how it affects her. She is seven and was diagnosed at three weeks old. Megan using her trampoline.

© Archant 2015

Children and staff at Worlingham Primary School have helped to brighten up the day for a young pupil who has cystic fibrosis.

Classmates of Megan Saul wear yellow to raise money for cystic fibrosis charityClassmates of Megan Saul wear yellow to raise money for cystic fibrosis charity

Seven-year-old Megan Saul was diagnosed with the condition when she was aged just three weeks following the heel prick blood test which is carried out on babies shortly after they are born.

Since then, she has battled through the daily struggles associated with the genetic disorder, including taking up to 30 tablets a day to stabilise the condition which mainly affects her lungs and digestive system.

To mark Cystic Fibrosis Awareness month in May, Megan decided she would help raise money for the Cystic Fibrosis Trust by asking everyone in her school to wear yellow for the day and bring in a donation for the cause.

The brave youngster also gave a talk to the whole school in the morning assembly explaining to her schoolmates exactly how the condition affects her and what she needs to do to keep it under control.

And thanks to donations from everyone at her school, Megan was able to raise £377 for the charity

Her mother Rebecca Weeks, said: “Megan asked if we could raise some money for the trust and she suggested that a wear yellow day at her 
school and her teachers agreed to it.

“Yellow is the colour used by the trust and it also happens to be Megan’s favourite colour.”

Cystic fibrosis causes the body to produce thick mucus, which affects the lungs and digestive system in particular.

It is estimated that one in every 2,500 babies born in the UK will be born with cystic fibrosis and there are more than 9,000 people living with the condition in this country.

There is no cure but many treatments are available to manage it, including physiotherapy, exercise, medication and nutrition.

Symptoms of cystic fibrosis can include a cough, repeated chest infections, prolonged diarrhoea and poor weight gain.

The Cystic Fibrosis Trust is focused on promoting the development of innovative and life-changing treatments and care to help people living with the condition.

Mrs Weeks said Megan occasionally has to 
miss some days at school as a result of the condition, but said the staff were hugely supportive.

“As well as the tablets, Megan needs to use nebulisers and have physiotherapy just to keep well and it’s also important for her to keep active,” she said.

“She loves trampolining and has just started running.”

Is a special event taking place at a school near you? Email lynn.crombie@archant.co.uk or call 01502 712060.

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