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Tributes paid to Flixton museum founder

PUBLISHED: 11:10 11 December 2009 | UPDATED: 08:58 01 August 2010

TRIBUTES have been paid to one of the founders of the Norfolk and Suffolk Aviation Museum at Flixton.

Alan Michael Hague was born on March 3, 1931 in Brundall, Norwich and after a long battle with cancer, died last Thursday at Lowestoft Hospital.

TRIBUTES have been paid to one of the founders of the Norfolk and Suffolk Aviation Museum at Flixton.

Alan Michael Hague was born on March 3, 1931 in Brundall, Norwich and after a long battle with cancer, died last Thursday at Lowestoft Hospital.

Mr Hague had a passion for aviation from a young age and his greatest disappointment was not being able to join the RAF, due to health reasons.

He joined the Royal Observer Corps in 1953 and was initially based at the Brundall Post, where he became a Leading Observer responsible for Aircraft recognition for his crew Romeo 2.

Mr Hague spent 15 years in the corps and was awarded a long service medal before leaving service from his final station at the Corton Post, Delta 2.

His love of aviation meant it was almost natural that he should become one of the founder members of the Norfolk and Suffolk Aviation Museum at Flixton. He spent 38 years voluntarily working with other enthusiasts to develop the museum from some planes in an open field to what it has become today, supported and helped by his wife Beryl.

For many years and up until shortly before his death he was the museum curator, spending countless hours of his spare time helping and working with others who also had an interest in aviation. Latterly the majority of his time was devoted to working with the Association of US 446th Bomb Group, which was based at the site of the museum during the Second World War, from where so many Americans lost their lives.

The museum has one hangar dedicated to the 446th Bomb Group, containing history and a mass of artefacts patiently acquired and assembled by Mr Hague and other museum members over the years. Through this Mr Hague had the privilege of meeting many Americans who fought in the war, many of whom became friends and of which some he and Beryl were fortunate enough to visit in the USA.

He also spent 46 years with the joinery manufacturing company Boulton & Paul (now known as Jeld-Wen). After an initial five year apprenticeship and then a number of years working as a joiner, he became the company's safety officer for its Lowestoft site. The recreational time he had left after his aviation interests and family was spent playing lawn bowls. This pastime gave him a great deal of pleasure and his skill meant he played to county level in his younger years.

A plaque will be laid in Mr Hague's memory for a lifetime of dedication, passion and success of the Norfolk and Suffolk Aviation Museum. Apart from his wife Beryl, daughter Christine and son Andrew and their families, he will be very sadly missed by his many, many friends and colleagues from all over the world.

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